Doctor of Medicine: Foundations of Medicine Class of 2027 Courses

Credits:

5

Directors:
Olken, Solitro
Grading:
Pass/Fail
Prerequisites:
None
Offered:
Term 1
Description:

Molecular Foundations is a five-week course that provides a fundamental understanding of the role of cells within the body, regulation of cellular growth and early development, and the regulation of energy metabolism. Cellular biochemistry and basic anatomical structure are introduced emphasizing the role of cells as the basic building blocks in ahierarchal system that increases in complexity as cells form tissues, organs, and organ systems. The influence nutrition and physiological state have on macronutrient metabolism is covered with special emphasis on the integration of carbohydrate and lipid metabolism in different organ systems. The consequences of defective glucose metabolism serves as a major clinical theme throughout the course.

Credits:

5

Directors:
Larson, Murray
Grading:
Pass/Fail
Prerequisites:
None
Offered:
Term 1
Description:

Genetic and Metabolic Disorders is a five-week course that provides a fundamental understanding of medical biochemistry relevant to the metabolism of macromolecular precursors and the genetic basis of disease. Medically-important metabolism of amino acids, lipids, and nucleotides, will be covered in the context of disease. The course also provides insight into ethanol metabolism and tissue damage associated with reactive oxygen species. Clinical disorders that have a genetic component will be covered, while a molecular framework is built for understanding disease etiology, modern diagnosis and therapeutic intervention. An overview of the basic genetics of medically important infectious agents, gene regulation, and population genetics will provide a background on the genetic underpinnings of human disease.

Credits:

5

Directors:
R. Baker, Allison
Grading:
Pass/Fail
Prerequisites:
None
Offered:
Term 2
Description:

Musculoskeletal system provides a fundamental understanding of musculoskeletal basic science principles, and the application of this knowledge. The five-week course covers normal features and pathological processes of the musculoskeletal system and integument including embryology, anatomy, histology, biochemistry, genetics, physiology, microbiology, immunology, pathology, pharmacology, and therapeutics. Human gross anatomical dissection is an integral component of the course that facilitates the students understanding of anatomical structure/function relationships. Clinical cases are presented in a team-based learning format to provide reinforcement of basic science concepts as they relate to clinical applications. Students gain additional experience in teaching their peers in this course.

Credits:

5

Directors:
Bauler, Proper
Grading:
Pass/Fail
Prerequisites:
None
Offered:
Term 1
Description:

Foundations of Immunology and Infectious Disease provides a fundamental understanding of the principles of immunology and infectious disease, and the application of this knowledge to immunologic, infectious, and rheumatologic diseases. The five-week course integrates immunology through the learning of microbiology and includes relevant aspects of anatomy, histology, pharmacology, and pathology. Specifically, students: (1) learn about the soluble mediators, cells, and organs of the immune system and how these elements work together to prevent infection; (2) examine how the immune system causes and contributes to diseases such as autoimmunity, allergy, and chronic inflammatory diseases; and (3) acquire the necessary foundational knowledge of virology, mycology, parasitology, and bacteriology to understand how infectious microbes cause organ-specific and systemic diseases. Clinical cases are presented in a team-based learning format to provide reinforcement of basic science concepts as they relate to clinical applications. After completing this course, medical students are able to apply the general concepts of immunology and infectious disease to specific diseases they encounter in future organ-based courses.

Credits:

5

Directors:
Elliott, Vural
Grading:
Pass/Fail
Prerequisites:
None
Offered:
Term 1
Description:

Hematology and Oncology provides a fundamental understanding of hematological and tumor biology basic science principles, and the application of this knowledge to clinical hematology, hematological oncology, and cancer. The four-week course focuses on the mechanistic and pathophysiological aspects of blood physiology and neoplasia using clinical examples of the various anemias, leukemias, lymphomas, and selected solid tumors. An overview of basic tumor pathology includes development and progression of benign and malignant disease, grading and staging of tumors, carcinogenesis, and metastasis. The course covers the biological mechanisms underlying cellular growth control, cell cycle regulation, apoptosis, tumor immunology, and the roles of oncogenes and tumor suppressor proteins. The pharmacology of major therapeutic agents used to treat hematological disorders and antineoplastic agents is described. Clinical cases are presented in a team-based learning format to provide reinforcement of basic science concepts as they relate to clinical applications. After completing this course, medical students are able to apply the general concepts of tumor biology and cancer therapeutics to specific neoplastic diseases they encounter in future organ-based courses.

Credits:

5

Directors:
Gyorkos, Reinoehl
Grading:
Pass/Fail
Prerequisites:
None
Offered:
Term 2
Description:

Cardiovascular System provides a fundamental understanding of cardiovascular basic science principles, and the application of this knowledge to cardiovascular diseases. The five-week course covers normal features and pathological processes of the cardiovascular system, including an integrated presentation of embryology, anatomy, physiology, microbiology, and immunology, and their relation to pathologies of the cardiovascular system. Woven through these topics is the practical introduction to key elements of the physical examination of the heart, and basic electrocardiogram interpretation. In addition, current evidence supporting methods of risk assessment, diagnostic testing, and pharmacologic prevention and management of cardiovascular disease are examined. Clinical scenarios such as shock and bradycardia are presented in high fidelity simulation. In addition, clinical cases are presented in a team-based learning format, including valvular heart disease, atherosclerosis, acute myocardial infarction, congenital heart defect, congestive heart failure, and arrhythmias, The simulations and team-based learning cases provide reinforcement of basic science concepts as they relate to clinical applications.

Credits:

5

Directors:
Nauli, Wilt
Grading:
Pass/Fail
Prerequisites:
None
Description:

Pulmonary System provides a fundamental understanding of pulmonary basic science principles, and the application of this knowledge to pulmonary diseases. The five-week course covers normal features and pathological processes of the pulmonary system including embryology, anatomy, physiology, microbiology, and immunology, and relating these to pathologies of the pulmonary system. The course starts with detailed and complete explanations of the physiological mechanisms that underlie the act of breathing, followed by exploration of the developmental anatomy of the lung, the gross anatomy of the upper and lower respiratory tract. Clinical problems and pulmonary function test data is examined at the molecular level, the level of the alveolus, the chest wall, and the pulmonary circulation. The course covers pathophysiological changes in lung function and the spectrum of lung disorders commonly seen in the human population. Ventilation-perfusion inequality and gas exchange defects are presented in team based learning exercises. The neurological basis of ventilatory control is investigated, and the role of central and peripheral chemoreceptors in ventilatory drive are uncovered, including a detailed overview of the biochemistry of hydrogen buffering and the mixed physiological buffering mechanisms of the blood. The clinical conditions of sleep apnea and related disorders, obstructive lung disease, restrictive lung disease, neoplastic lung disease, immune mediated hemorrhage syndromes, bacterial and viral bronchitis, fungal and mycoplasma atypical pneumonia, atelectasis, acute respiratory distress syndrome, pleural disease, acute lung injury and failing heart/pulmonary vascular disease are covered. Clinical cases are presented in a team-based learning format to provide reinforcement of basic science concepts as they relate to clinical applications.

Credits:

5

Directors:
Temprine, George
Grading:
Pass/Fail
Prerequisites:
None
Offered:
Term 1
Description:

Renal and Genitourinary System provides a fundamental understanding of renal and genitourinary basic science principles, and the application of this knowledge to renal and genitourinary diseases. The five-week course covers normal features and pathological processes of the renal and genitourinary system including anatomy, biochemistry, genetics, physiology, microbiology, immunology, pathology, pharmacology and therapeutics, and preventive medicine. The course includes the structure and function of the kidneys, the regulation of fluids and electrolytes, and the common imbalances of renal physiology that result in disease. Working in groups, students will study a number of renal disorders in a team-based learning format including diabetic nephropathy, hypokalemia, renal cancer, transport disorders, and graft vs. host disease following renal transplantation. The course covers the pathophysiology of electrolyte disorders, acid-base disorders, glomerular disease, tubulo-interstitial disease, acute renal failure, chronic kidney disease, renal replacement therapies, and urology. Clinical cases are presented in a team-based learning format to provide reinforcement of basic science concepts as they relate to clinical applications.

Credits:

5

Directors:
T. Bauler, Miller
Grading:
Pass/Fail
Prerequisites:
None
Offered:
Term 1
Description:

Gastrointestinal System provides a fundamental understanding of gastrointestinal basic science principles, and the application of this knowledge to gastrointestinal diseases. The five-week course covers normal features and pathological processes of the gastrointestinal system including physiology, pharmacology, anatomy, histology, pathology, mucosal immunology, nutrition, biochemistry, microbiology, developmental biology and neuroscience and relating these to pathologies of the gastrointestinal system. The course provides students with a comprehensive understanding of the diseases and disorders of the gastrointestinal system and its associated accessory organs to: (1) diagnose, effectively treat and manage gastrointestinal-related illnesses, (2) address patient issues and concerns regarding a gastrointestinal complaint and (3) understand the various gastrointestinal-related disorders associated with pediatric and geriatric patients. Clinical sciences and skills include discussion of the common causes of gastrointestinal diseases and disorders, collecting a relevant history based on an abdominal complaint and the appropriate evaluation and treatment of patients with common gastrointestinal abnormalities. Clinical cases are presented in a team-based learning format to provide reinforcement of basic science concepts as they relate to clinical applications.

Credits:

6

Directors:
Bouma, Ergun-Longmire
Grading:
Pass/Fail
Prerequisites:
None
Offered:
Term 1
Description:

Endocrinology and Reproduction Systems provides a fundamental understanding of classic endocrinology, followed by the basic principles and pathologies specific to men and women, including the complexities of pregnancy. Clinical content is woven throughout the course to reinforce the basic science concepts as they relate to clinical application(s), and at the end of each week a highly integrated clinical case is presented in team-based learning format. The course is subdivided into two major sections. The first half of the course concentrates on classic endocrinology and includes the hypothalamic-pituitary axis, thyroid function, calcium-phosphate homeostasis, and the adrenal gland. The second half focuses on the gender-specific differences and/or similarities between the reproductive systems of men and women. Multiple events illustrate the 'grey areas' of reproductive health to highlight the ethical, societal and political challenges evident in this area of medicine. The course concludes with the topic of human sexuality, including interactive discussions about the societal and ethical responsibilities (and challenges) that the modern clinician may face when treating members of the straight and LGBT communities.

Credits:

6

Directors:
Bunka, Vollbrecht
Grading:
Pass/Fail
Prerequisites:
None
Offered:
Term 2
Description:

Nervous System provides a fundamental understanding of neurological basic science principles and introduction to the application of these principles to diagnosing and treating neurological diseases. The five-week course covers normal features and processes of the nervous system, including embryology, anatomy, physiology, microbiology, and immunology, and relates these to pathologies of the nervous system. The course explores the organization, development, and physiology of the human central nervous system in relation to the essential principles of neurological function. This exploration extends from the cellular and molecular mechanisms of neuronal signaling to the organization and function of sensory and motor systems and of higher order, integrative systems. The course provides an understanding of the neural and vascular anatomy of the human brain and spinal cord that is sufficient for localizing lesions within the central nervous system and that supports understanding and performing an effective neurological examination. The course equips students to interpret impairments of sensation, motor function, and cognition that accompany neurological injury and disease, as well as to develop and test mechanistic hypotheses to explain clinical signs and symptoms. The course provides an introduction to pharmacological and non-pharmacological treatments for neurological disorders, as well as to basic principles of neuropathology and neuroradiology. Clinical cases are presented in a team-based learning format to provide reinforcement of basic science concepts as they relate to clinical applications.

Credits:

4

Directors:
Riddle/Peiffer, Yessengaliyeva
Grading:
Pass/Fail
Prerequisites:
None
Description:

Behavioral Medicine extends and deepens the understanding of neurological basic science principles provided in Nervous System. The four-week course covers human development as it relates to normal and abnormal intellectual development and psychological well-being, and explores the biopsychosocial model, including the ability to describe and discuss the mechanisms, clinical presentation, and treatment of common psychiatric disorders (e.g., anxiety, mood disorders, substance abuse, psychoses, compulsive disorders, and personality disorders). In conjunction with the Profession of Medicine course, students develop familiarity with the foundations of effective mental status- and psychiatric examinations, as well as psychological and neuropsychological evaluations. The course covers the indications and pharmacological profiles of medications that are commonly used to treat psychiatric disorders, introduces nonpharmacological treatments for psychiatric disorders, and introduces students to the roles and importance of multi-disciplinary teams in neurological and psychiatric rehabilitation. Clinical cases are presented in a team-based learning format to provide reinforcement of basic science concepts as they relate to clinical applications.

Credits:

5

Directors:
Channell; Kilpatrick
Grading:
Pass/Fail
Prerequisites:
None
Description:

Clinical Skills is one of the three components of the Profession of Medicine courses. It is structured in a longitudinal format with Clinical Skills Educators (CSEs) for the entire two years. Clinical Skills is the essential core of "doctoring" course. In each of the courses you will learn the fundamental skills necessary to become a skilled future practicing physician. These courses are designed to provide each of you as a medical student the opportunity to build the core knowledge and skills needed for patient care. Excellent communication skills, as well as proficiency in physical diagnosis and clinical reasoning are essential to quality patient care. The Clinical Skills courses are structured to guide you through the basic foundational steps to give each of you the skills and knowledge you will need to provide patient care. The first course begins with a focus on developing your communication skills; the aspects of the medical interview are outlined and through practice sessions with Standardized Patients your proficiency in this area are developed. The next phases of Clinical Skills add the elements of a basic core physical examination along with continued medical interview training. The courses are structured in a developmental format, advancing patient communication skills as well as increasing complexity with physical examination skills and oral and written presentation skills. Each session will build on skills learned in the previous session. During Clinical Skills 1: using the Calgary-Cambridge model as an outline, students will practice effective communication techniques with standardized patients.

Credits:

3

Directors:
Channell; Kilpatrick
Grading:
Pass/Fail
Prerequisites:
None
Description:

Clinical Skills is one of the three components of the Profession of Medicine courses. It is structured in a longitudinal format with Clinical Skills Educators (CSEs) for the entire two years. Clinical Skills is the essential core of "doctoring" course. In each of the courses you will learn the fundamental skills necessary to become a skilled future practicing physician. These courses are designed to provide each of you as a medical student the opportunity to build the core knowledge and skills needed for patient care. Excellent communication skills, as well as proficiency in physical diagnosis and clinical reasoning are essential to quality patient care. The Clinical Skills courses are structured to guide you through the basic foundational steps to give each of you the skills and knowledge you will need to provide patient care. The first course begins with a focus on developing your communication skills; the aspects of the medical interview are outlined and through practice sessions with Standardized Patients your proficiency in this area are developed. The next phases of Clinical Skills add the elements of a basic core physical examination along with continued medical interview training. The courses are structured in a developmental format, advancing patient communication skills as well as increasing complexity with physical examination skills and oral and written presentation skills. Each session will build on skills learned in the previous session. Clinical Skills 2 starts with the Comprehensive Core Physical Exam. Standardized patients and peers are used when appropriate for practice. Students will continue to add to their communication skills and begin to organize the approach to the patient history, and focused history for symptom clusters will be introduced.The specific comprehensive Musculoskeletal Physical Exam will be taught during this course as well as the Complete Neuro and Cardio Physical Exam. Cardiac examination on Standardized Patients learning abnormal heart sounds and practice using simulation.

Credits:

4

Grading:
Pass/Fail
Prerequisites:
None
Description:

Clinical Skills is one of the three components of the Profession of Medicine courses. It is structured in a longitudinal format with Clinical Skills Educators (CSEs) for the entire two years. Clinical Skills is the essential core of "doctoring" course. In each of the courses you will learn the fundamental skills necessary to become a skilled future practicing physician. These courses are designed to provide each of you as a medical student the opportunity to build the core knowledge and skills needed for patient care. Excellent communication skills, as well as proficiency in physical diagnosis and clinical reasoning are essential to quality patient care. The Clinical Skills courses are structured to guide you through the basic foundational steps to give each of you the skills and knowledge you will need to provide patient care. The first course begins with a focus on developing your communication skills; the aspects of the medical interview are outlined and through practice sessions with Standardized Patients your proficiency in this area are developed. The next phases of Clinical Skills add the elements of a basic core physical examination along with continued medical interview training. The courses are structured in a developmental format, advancing patient communication skills as well as increasing complexity with physical examination skills and oral and written presentation skills. Each session will build on skills learned in the previous session.At the beginning of each first session in clinical skills new organ based course, an overview will be provided by the discipline specialist of the specific physical examination and clinical findings. The course continues with an overview and practice in advanced communication skills to enhance patient-centered care. Medical students will have the opportunity to practice negotiating a treatment plan, building a mutual plan of care, sustaining structure and flow to the patient encounter, and building a physician-patient relationship. During this course in-patient experiences and written histories and physicals with problem list is added. Students will also have the opportunity to practice oral presentations.

Credits:

2

Directors:
L. Bauler
Grading:
Pass/Fail
Prerequisites:
None
Description:

Principles of Medicine is a series of courses that span all four years of medical school. These
courses provide an integrated curriculum of health systems science and the art of medicine to
ensure a competent and compassionate physician that serves patients, families, and society. The
curriculum is coordinated with the biomedical sciences courses during Foundations of Medicine
(years 1 and 2) and the third-year clerkships during Clinical Applications.

Credits:

2

Directors:
L. Bauler
Grading:
Pass/Fail
Prerequisites:
None
Description:

Principles of Medicine is a series of courses that span all four years of medical school. These
courses provide an integrated curriculum of health systems science and the art of medicine to
ensure a competent and compassionate physician that serves patients, families, and society. The
curriculum is coordinated with the biomedical sciences courses during Foundations of Medicine
(years 1 and 2) and the third-year clerkships during Clinical Applications.

Credits:

2

Directors:
L. Bauler
Grading:
Pass/Fail
Prerequisites:
None
Description:

Principles of Medicine is a series of courses that span all four years of medical school. These
courses provide an integrated curriculum of health systems science and the art of medicine to
ensure a competent and compassionate physician that serves patients, families, and society. The
curriculum is coordinated with the biomedical sciences courses during Foundations of Medicine
(years 1 and 2) and the third-year clerkships during Clinical Applications.

Credits:

1

Directors:
Dickson, Longjohn
Grading:
Pass/Fail
Prerequisites:
None
Description:

This course introduces medical students to the service-learning requirement of the Liaison Committee on Medical Education Accreditation (LCME). Service learning is a structured learning experience that combines community service with preparation and reflection. It is a platform for students to provide community service in response to community identified concerns and learn about the context in which service is provided, the connection between their service and their academic coursework, and their roles as citizens and professionals.

Credits:

1

Directors:
Dickson, Longjohn
Grading:
Pass/Fail
Prerequisites:
None
Description:

This course introduces medical students to the service-learning requirement of the Liaison Committee on Medical Education Accreditation (LCME). Service learning is a structured learning experience that combines community service with preparation and reflection. It is a platform for students to provide community service in response to community identified concerns and learn about the context in which service is provided, the connection between their service and their academic coursework, and their roles as citizens and professionals.

Credits:

1

Directors:
Dickson, Longjohn
Grading:
Pass/Fail
Prerequisites:
None
Description:

This course introduces medical students to the service-learning requirement of the Liaison Committee on Medical Education Accreditation (LCME). Service learning is a structured learning experience that combines community service with preparation and reflection. It is a platform for students to provide community service in response to community identified concerns and learn about the context in which service is provided, the connection between their service and their academic coursework, and their roles as citizens and professionals.

Credits:

7

Directors:
Allen
Grading:
Pass/Fail
Prerequisites:
None
Description:

The clinical reasoning course is an intensive USMLE Step 1 preparation course. Students will be guided by the course director to develop a plan that incorporates 50+ hours of study per week, utilizing the appropriate resources, such as, the UWorld question bank, First Aid, Sketchy Series, Pathoma, and other credible resources as needed. By the end of the course, students will be prepared to sit for the USMLE Step 1.

Credits:

0

Directors:
Gibson
Grading:
Pass/Fail
Prerequisites:
None
Description:

WMED recognizes that the development of behaviors consistent with medical professionals is a longitudinal process. Professionalism is continually evaluated throughout all four years of the curriculum. Course/clerkship directors are required to document each student's professional behaviors and to include an assessment of the student's professionalism and engagement which will contribute to the final grade in the longitudinal Professional Development course, as well as clerkship grades. Each course/clerkship has outlined the engagement and professionalism expectations to be assessed. Once students begin clerkships, the Professional Development course focuses on the cultivation of lifelong habits that are critical to credentialing, complying with occupational health requirements of medical providers, completion of course evaluations, and activities that will translate into maintaining medical staff privileges. The grade matrix reflects these expectations. This process facilitates longitudinal tracking of behavior to identify concerns, as well as areas of commendation. Repeated professionalism concerns are referred to the assistant dean for Clinical Competency and IPE. Commendations are tracked as a component of the Professional Development grade and potential inclusion in the student's MSPE. In addition to the formal assessments of professional behaviors as part of a courses/clerkship, all faculty and staff, at any time, may provide confidential feedback regarding the behavior of any medical student utilizing the online Medical Student Feedback Form (MSFF).

Credits:

0

Directors:
Gibson
Grading:
Honors/High Pass/Pass/Fail
Prerequisites:
None
Description:

WMED recognizes that the development of behaviors consistent with medical professionals is a longitudinal process. Professionalism is continually evaluated throughout all four years of the curriculum. Course/clerkship directors are required to document each student's professional behaviors and to include an assessment of the student's professionalism and engagement which will contribute to the final grade in the longitudinal Professional Development course, as well as clerkship grades. Each course/clerkship has outlined the engagement and professionalism expectations to be assessed. Once students begin clerkships, the Professional Development course focuses on the cultivation of lifelong habits that are critical to credentialing, complying with occupational health requirements of medical providers, completion of course evaluations, and activities that will translate into maintaining medical staff privileges. The grade matrix reflects these expectations. This process facilitates longitudinal tracking of behavior to identify concerns, as well as areas of commendation. Repeated professionalism concerns are referred to the assistant dean for Clinical Competency and IPE. Commendations are tracked as a component of the Professional Development grade and potential inclusion in the student's MSPE. In addition to the formal assessments of professional behaviors as part of a courses/clerkship, all faculty and staff, at any time, may provide confidential feedback regarding the behavior of any medical student utilizing the online Medical Student Feedback Form (MSFF).

Credits:

0

Directors:
Gibson
Grading:
Honors/High Pass/Pass/Fail
Prerequisites:
None
Description:

WMED recognizes that the development of behaviors consistent with medical professionals is a longitudinal process. Professionalism is continually evaluated throughout all four years of the curriculum. Course/clerkship directors are required to document each student's professional behaviors and to include an assessment of the student's professionalism and engagement which will contribute to the final grade in the longitudinal Professional Development course, as well as clerkship grades. Each course/clerkship has outlined the engagement and professionalism expectations to be assessed. Once students begin clerkships, the Professional Development course focuses on the cultivation of lifelong habits that are critical to credentialing, complying with occupational health requirements of medical providers, completion of course evaluations, and activities that will translate into maintaining medical staff privileges. The grade matrix reflects these expectations. This process facilitates longitudinal tracking of behavior to identify concerns, as well as areas of commendation. Repeated professionalism concerns are referred to the assistant dean for Clinical Competency and IPE. Commendations are tracked as a component of the Professional Development grade and potential inclusion in the student's MSPE. In addition to the formal assessments of professional behaviors as part of a courses/clerkship, all faculty and staff, at any time, may provide confidential feedback regarding the behavior of any medical student utilizing the online Medical Student Feedback Form (MSFF).

Credits:

.5

Directors:
Crutchfield
Grading:
Pass/Fail
Prerequisites:
None
Offered:
Term 1
Description:

The practice of medicine is supposed to be the practice of preventing and treating disease. But whether a condition counts as a disease depends on some set of factors related to evolution, function, well-being, and social attitudes, among others. This course will survey the most common theories of disease and integrate these theories into the contemporary practice of medicine.

Credits:

.5

Directors:
Crutchfield
Grading:
Pass/Fail
Prerequisites:
None
Offered:
Term 2
Description:

The prevalence and incidence of disease varies according to biological and social categories. Yet not all differences in prevalence and incidence of disease are a health disparity. This course will introduce students to the foundational theories of health disparity and the social determinants of health. Learners will then identify those disparities and social determinants that fall within the scope of the practice of medicine.

Credits:

.5

Directors:
Crutchfield
Grading:
Pass/Fail
Prerequisites:
None
Description:

The concept of social justice relates to the appropriate distribution of resources. Often, however, what constitutes just distribution of health care resources is assumed. There are a variety of foundational theories of social justice, each of which may imply a distinct distribution of health care resources. This course will introduce learners to the foundational theories of social justice in health care and evaluate the different implications they have for how society arranges health care resources.

Credits:

.5

Directors:
Crutchfield
Grading:
Pass/Fail
Prerequisites:
None
Description:

Whether a difference in health condition is inequitable depends on, among other things, whether that condition is a disease and whether its distribution and/or treatment are just (i.e., distributed according to the correct theory of social justice). This course will identify those differences in health conditions and their treatments that may be unjustly distributed and analyze those interventions which may effectively repair the potential injustice.

Credits:

1

Directors:
Swintal
Grading:
Pass/Fail
Prerequisites:
None
Offered:
Term 1
Description:

Transition to Medical School course prepares students to understand, participate, and excel in the medical school curriculum. It is divided into three separate weeks. These three weeks are structured as student success weeks, providing students with the structure and opportunities to connect with medical school services and support offices. Throughout these weeks, students explore topics related to their success, building their academic and relationship skills as part of the curriculum domain of Personal and Professional Management. Topics include student organizations, time management, stress management, study skills, learning skills, test-taking skills, information management and library skills, financial aid and planning, personal assessment, and emotional intelligence. Students additionally take a Medical First Responder course, which provides a brief, broad-based introduction to medical emergencies and the health care system. At the conclusion of this course, students become licensed Medical First Responders.

Credits:

1

Directors:
K. Redinger
Grading:
Pass/Fail
Prerequisites:
None
Offered:
Term 2
Description:

Transition to Clinical Applications provides the bridge between foundations of medicine and the clinical application of medical knowledge. The course begins with a comprehensive summative examination (NBME CBSE) covering content presented in Foundations. Students will participate in simulation, group-based workshops, and discussions to prepare for the clinical learning environment and focus on patient care. Our goal is to preparing students to thrive in the clinical setting. Students participate in BLS recertification and procedural skills development and assessment during the last week of the course.

Note: Throughout this course, students should plan to enter the building at 7:30am. Prebrief begins promptly at 7:45am. At this time, expectations and scheduling for the day are reviewed. Questions about the day's events are answered.